Friday, March 31, 2017

ART TOPILOW IN CONCERT WITH ALL-STAR BAND IN DEAL PARK ON SUNDAY

ART TOPLILOW IN CONCERT: Over the Rainbow": The Songs of Harold Arlen  
FEATURING ALL-STAR JAZZ BAND, ANN HAMPTON CALLAWAY, KEN WASSER

WHEN: SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 3 P.M.
WHERE:
Axelrod Performing Arts Center, 100 Grant Avenue, Deal Park
TICKETS: $25.00 - $42.00
CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS

"Dr. Jazz" as the famous oncologist (Dr. Arthur Topilow, above) from Jersey Shore Medical Center is known will be accompanying one of the world's most celebrated jazz vocalists Ann Hampton Callaway (left) in an all-Arlen concert at the Axelrod Performing Arts Center (APAC). Callaway was nominated for a Tony Award for her performance in the Broadway musical "Swing" and her original compositions have earned her a Grammy nomination. She is one of the nation's biggest proponents of the Great American Songbook, and she has long been associated with the great Harold Arlen, having recorded many of his immortal tunes including "Come Rain or Come Shine," "That Old Black Magic," "Blues in the Night" and "Let's Fall in Love." Her claim-to-fame (in the trivia world) is that she wrote and sang the theme to the TV show "The Nanny." The NY Times reviewed Callaway saying "For sheer vocal beauty, no contemporary singer matches Ms. Callaway."

By day, Arthur Topilow, MD is the Director of Oncology Research for Meridian Cancer Care and Director of Axelrod Research; by night he is a jazz musician with enviable piano and improvisational skills. He shared the stage with many jazz luminaries including Dick Hyman, Derek Smith, Ken Peplowski, Ed Polcer, Randy Sanke, James Chirillo and Aaron Weinstein and has accompanied Broadway stars Bernadette Peters and Christine Ebersol.

With over 400 songs in his catalogue, Harold Arlen could have secured his immortality with just one song, "Over the Rainbow." Recorded by a 17-year-old Judy Garland in the classic film "The Wizard of Oz," the song is regarded by the recording industry and the National Endowment of the Arts as "Greatest Songs of the 20th Century." Arlen's most prolific writing partner was E.Y. Harburg, but he also wrote songs with Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin, Dorothy Fields, Howard Dietz, Ted Koehler, Truman Capote...and even Peggy Lee.

Artistic Director Andrew DePrisco has always felt that Harold Arlen was the greatest unsung hero in the Great American Songbook. "It struck me decades ago when I was studying that Arlen was the most unpredictable of the songwriters. How could the same guy write "Over the Rainbow," "The Man That Got Away," "It's Only a Paper Moon" and "Ac-cen-tu-ate the Positive"? Ahead of Arlen in popularity in the catalogue are more familiar names like George Gershwin and Irving Berlin, both of whom held Arlen in the highest regard. Gershwin said of his colleague: "He's the most original of all of us." Berlin summed it up: "He wasn't as well known as some of us, but he was a better songwriter than most of us..."

Countless great vocalists have secured hits with Arlen tunes: Sinatra with "I've Got the World on a String"  and "Last Night When We Were Young," Tony Bennett's "One for My Baby," Judy Garland with "The Man That Got Away" and "Get Happy," Lena Horne with "Stormy Weather," Bing Crosby with "Ac-cen-tu-ate the Positive," Nat King Cole with "It's Only a Paper Moon," Barbra Streisand with "Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home " and Dean Martin with "Hit the Road to Dreamland."