Monday, June 8, 2020

Witnesses who chose action over indifference

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

At this time of sorrow, hope, and resolve for our nation, we look back at powerful messages and stories of those who used their agency—sometimes at great personal risk—to make a difference in the moment and for the future. From a young diarist during the Holocaust to an American civil rights leader, the efforts of these individuals provide historical context and lessons about the dangers of indifference.

Dr. David Arolianski treats a patient in his clinic in the Kovno ghetto. He was killed in a bunker during the ghetto’s liquidation in 1944. Courtesy of George Kadish/Zvi Kadushin

TUNE IN
Facebook Live | The Danger of Indifference

Remind me: June 10, 9:30 a.m. ET >>

Anne Frank, circa 1939. Anne Frank House

TUNE IN
Facebook Live | Anne Frank and Other Hidden Children

Remind me: June 12, 9:30 a.m. ET >>

Museum founder Elie Wiesel

LISTEN
“I Fought All My Life against Indifference”
Elie Wiesel on remembrance >>

Representative John Lewis, the recipient of the Museum’s Elie Wiesel Award in 2016

    WATCH

Rep. John Lewis Speaks to Young People
 “Do what you can, what you must” >>

Sophie Scholl, a member of the White Rose resistance movement, 1942. George (Jürgen) Wittenstein/akg-images

READ
        Some Young Germans Acted after Learning of Murder of Jews
“We will not be silent” >>

Julien Bryan films during the siege of Warsaw in 1939. Gift of Julien Bryan Archive

EXPLORE
American Risked Life to Photograph Siege of Warsaw
“Everyone would believe my pictures” >>


Photos: All images US Holocaust Memorial Museum unless otherwise indicated. Anne Frank, circa 1939. Anne Frank House; Museum founder Elie Wiesel; US Representative John Lewis, the recipient of the Museum’s Elie Wiesel Award in 2016; Sophie Scholl, a member of the White Rose resistance movement, 1942. George (Jürgen) Wittenstein/akg-images; Julien Bryan films during the siege of Warsaw in 1939. Gift of Julien Bryan Archive